Mathematics Research Guide: Podcasts in Mathematics

If you studied algebra in high school or you’re learning it right now , there’s a good chance you’re familiar with the quadratic formula. If not, it’s possible you repressed it. By this point, billions of us have had to learn, memorise, and implement this unwieldy algorithm in order to solve quadratic equations, but according to mathematician Po-Shen Loh from Carnegie Mellon University, there’s actually been an easier and better way all along, although it’s remained almost entirely hidden for thousands of years. In a new research paper , Loh celebrates the quadratic formula as a “remarkable triumph of early mathematicians” dating back to the beginnings of the Old Babylonian Period around BCE, but also freely acknowledges some of its ancient shortcomings. That arduous task — performed by approximately four millennia worth of maths students, no less — may not have been entirely necessary, as it happens. Of course, there have always been alternatives to the quadratic formula , such as factoring, completing the square, or even breaking out the graph paper. But the quadratic formula is generally regarded as the most comprehensive and reliable method for solving quadratic problems, even if it is a bit inscrutable. This is what it looks like:. In September, Loh was brainstorming the mathematics behind quadratic equations when he struck upon a new, simplified way of deriving the same formula — an alternative method which he describes in his paper as a “computationally-efficient, natural, and easy-to-remember algorithm for solving general quadratic equations”. He uses an averaging technique that concentrates on the sum, as opposed to the more commonly taught way of focusing on the product of two numbers that make up c, which requires guesswork to solve problems.

Did a mathematician really solve a million-dollar math problem?

Anecdotally many mathematicians report a shared genealogy with Swiss mathematician Leonhard Euler, born in The insight comes from an analysis of the Mathematics Genealogy Project MGP , which aims to connect all mathematicians, living and dead, into family trees on the basis of teacher—pupil lineages, in particular who an individual’s doctoral adviser was. Since the early s, its organizers have mined information from university departments and from individuals who make submissions regarding themselves or people they know about.

As of 25 August, the MGP contained , entries. As well as doctoral advisers PhD advisers in recent times and pupils of academic mathematicians, the organizers record details such as the university that awarded the doctorate.

The following table lists many specialized symbols commonly used in mathematics, ordered by their introduction date. Note that the table can also be ordered.

Caleb used maths to score his dream girl. Picture: Pixabay Source:Supplied. When a Sydney actuary found himself with too much time on his hands, he turned to popular millennial dating app Coffee Meets Bagelfor help. Caleb changed his profile accordingly, including a portrait photo of himself, an image with his back to the camera in a scenic location, and a standard group picture where he was right in the middle.

Only a month later, he met the girl of his dreams. It all started when Caleb was on his way to a ski trip in Whistler. In a comic twist, before he even set foot on the ski field, he managed to break his foot. So he used what he knew best — maths — to solve the equation. Picture: News Corp Source:Supplied. There are two ways to meet people on the service, he explained.

First-years: Don’t fall in love, according to math

Chris McKinlay was folded into a cramped fifth-floor cubicle in UCLA’s math sciences building, lit by a single bulb and the glow from his monitor. The subject: large-scale data processing and parallel numerical methods. While the computer chugged, he clicked open a second window to check his OkCupid inbox. McKinlay, a lanky year-old with tousled hair, was one of about 40 million Americans looking for romance through websites like Match.

The Department of Mathematics at Imperial College London is an internationally renowned department within one of the world’s most prestigious universities.

If you wiped any memory of maths lessons from your mind as soon as you left high school, chances are the thought of using maths in everyday life as an adult, turns your stomach a little. But what if you were able to use simple maths to figure out your best online dating profile match? Or choose the shortest line in the supermarket? Enter something known as optimal stopping, a mathematical system helping you figure out the odds in a situation with numerous options.

Ms Serna said the maths only worked if you did not go backwards — like back to an ex, for example. The optimal stopping principle can also be used if you are in the market for buying a house or a car, or anything you have a range of options for. Alongside optimal stopping, Ms Serna said there were many “friendly” equations, lessons and mathematical theories that could help you navigate life. Ms Serna points out that, alongside maths, there are psychological elements in play when choosing a queue.

De Econometrist

Okay, go on. This led me on a rabbit hunt through the internet to understand where that number the 37 percent came from. This is also where the concept of e started to go a little over my head and I stopped Googling.

It’s a tricky question, and as with many tricky questions, mathematics has an answer of sorts: it’s 37%. Out of all the people you could possibly date.

It highlights red flags for men who need to be approached with caution. There is a whole list of potentially bad signs, including neglecting to shower in the previous week and talking only about himself. The list of bad features also includes professions to avoid. Can you guess the first profession on the list? OK, I think you should be able to meta-guess given the fact that I am writing about it. Indeed, the list on page 64 starts:. When I was a student I had a theory that mathematicians are different from physicists.

My theory was based on two conferences on mathematical physics I attended in a row. The first one was targeted for mathematicians and the second for physicists. The first one was very quiet, and the second one was all boozing and partying. So I decided that mathematicians are introverts and physicists are extroverts.

Department of Mathematics

Home Articles The maths of online dating. You might not think that finding your true love and mathematics have much in common, however increasingly you would be wrong. Just like the fact that more people are shopping online every year, more people are also dating online. This means that online dating is big business and consequently the sites that are best at helping people to meet their future partners are going to succeed in the market.

Posted: Apr 28, BE.

First off, why are you assuming that because someone is a mathematician, they have “stuff they like to do in general”? The friends I have in Math couldn’t really be more different. They’re as diverse as any other set of graduate students, in my experience. I guess my best advice would be too treat us like human beings instead of some kind of monolithic hive mind, I. Treat us like we have individuality and don’t have “stuff we like to do in general”. Get to know us, basically. We are the Math.

We will add your biological and intellectual distinctiveness to our own. Your research will adapt to service us. Resistance is futile. I was not able to hold a decent conversation with person A mainly because there was no common ground, whereas for person B, it was much easier because there was a common ground. I supposed I should have made it more clear at the beginning. How should I approach person A more efficiently knowing that there is no common ground between each others?

This Calculator Gives the Endless Casual Dating Phase an Expiration Date

FRY: People get really properly angry about it. There is a kind of joke in the U. FRY: As far as I’m concerned, I struggle to find anything in the world that you can’t get an interesting perspective on by using maths. RAZ: Including perhaps the most mysterious, inexplicable part of life, which is of course love.

Mathematician online dating – If you are a middle-aged woman looking to have a good time dating woman half your age, this article is for you. Join the leader in.

How to find love using the numbers game. Image: iStock. This self-proclaimed Type A personality figured out the perfect love formula and is now happily married. When I became single in my mid-twenties, I decided to get serious about dating. The rest of my life was great: I had a successful career, friends who made me laugh, and I’d just come back from a three-month backpacking holiday.

My Type A personality and obsession for planning stuff helped me achieve life goals. But this is probably why my last relationship failed. My ex avoided responsibility, and he affectionately called me “the spreadsheet queen “. When my friend’s mum told me that dating is about math, I was totally interested. This seemed sensible, even though her theory was ridiculously simple: “meet as many people as possible, as quickly as possible.

I didn’t need a fairytale, I needed maths.

The mathematician’s guide to dating

Dr Elena Marensi explains how Leonardo da Vinci’s studies of flowing water made him the father of her discipline, fluid mechanics. Our range of MSc courses provide a great stepping stone towards a career in mathematics and statistics in the age of big data. Students come from all over the world for our range of degrees. You can cover everything from the beauty and intricacy of pure mathematics to its applications in business, computing and medicine. Our researchers are unlocking fundamental mathematical principles and developing new statistical tools.

When my friend’s mum told me that dating is about math, I was totally by mathematicians, and mathematician Chris McKinlay wrote a book.

Pick up the key ideas in the book with this quick summary. Love is fantastic, complicated, can be painful, and love is full of patterns. This particular subject is what mathematician Hannah Fry has poured her love into, revealing what mathematics can tell us about the secrets of lasting relationships. Mathematician Peter Backus was one of these discouraged bachelors. In , Backus went as far as to prove that there were more intelligent alien civilizations in existence than there were potential girlfriends for him!

His conclusion was based on calculations guided by the following questions: How many women live near me? For Backus who was living in London, that answer was four million. How many are likely to be of the right age range? This total came to 20 percent or , women. How many are likely to be single? That amount of women was 50 percent or ,

Strategic dating: The 37% rule

An internationally renowned department within one of the world’s most prestigious universities. The Mathematics department has a regular series of seminars and an active events programme, including the Departmental Colloquia. Find out more. View events organised within and relevant to the Maths Department, including our Colloquia series.

Dating this is made more difficult since it is not known how much the text was changed or added to over time. Let us first look at the various theories about the date.

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The mathematics of love